Rebirth of the Full Motion Video (FMV)

Before accelerated near-photo realistic 3D graphics in computer games, there were Full Motion Video (FMV) Games. FMVs are games that use live-action videos used in place of real-time or pre-rendered animations. Using FMV was an attempt to make videogames look “more like movies”, with live-action actors speaking directly to players.

The downside is that FMV requires a lot of disk space, and looks absolutely terrible by comparison. Unfortunately, the FMV became extinct with the evolution of the computer game. Although, not very popular today, FMV Games were HUGE in the 1990s (List of FMV Games). With today’s Massive Disk and Memory Space, High Definition, Stereoscopic 3D, and 7.1 Surround Sound, the rebirth of the next generation FMV is upon us.

Who will be brave enough to revive the Genre? Me? I don’t know yet, but, I do know that FMV Games would allow me to merge my passion for Computer Games Development with my new found hobby of Film Making. The terms FMV Game and Interactive Movie are often used synonymously. However, I visualize the difference between Movie and Game as a Gauge, measured in units of interactivity. Less interaction is a Interactive Movie, more interaction is a FMV. My goal is to create both. Top 5 Viral Interactive Films

Creating interactivity for Movies is now easier than ever with Youtube, Quicktime Pro, and Flash. However, I have yet to find an Rapid Development Application specifically for developing a FMVs and Interactive Movies (HitFilm 3 hint, hint :biggrin: ).

On the other hand, creating a movies for interactivity is much more challenging and I’ve been looking into world of Interactive Fiction to find inspiration. I’m also seeking out audio/visual interactivity techniques to such as eye exercises and memory games to engage viewers interactively.

13TH STREET, Last Call – The first interactive Movie (Software by Powerflasher) developed a very intriguing way to interact with the audience via cellphone. I found inspiration in Last Call and Loews Theatres’ interactive cinema technology that requires much less complexity, offers more flexibility, and interacts with entire audience simultaneously. Next Generation Full Motion Video Game/Interactive Movie System (NGFVM):

Its funny how things have changed. Movies were once used to make games, but now games are used to make movies (Machinima).